David Ogilvy

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David Ogilvy     David Ogilvy

United Kingdom: Born: June 23, 1911, West Horsley

David Mackenzie Ogilvy 23 June 1911 – 21 July 1999 was an advertising executive who was widely hailed as The Father of Advertising. In 1962, Time called him “the most sought-after wizard in today’s advertising industry”.

His book Ogilvy on Advertising is a general commentary on advertising and not all the ads shown in the book are his. In early 2004, Adweek magazine asked people in the business “Which individuals – alive or dead – made you consider pursuing a career in advertising?”, and Ogilvy topped the list. The same result came when students of advertising were surveyed. His best-selling book Confessions of an Advertising Man is one of the most popular and famous books on advertising. Based on this book, there is a strong suspicion that Ogilvy is the inspiration for Don Draper in the popular series Mad Men.

Creative brilliance: had a strong emphasis on the “BIG IDEA”.

Research: coming, as he did, from a background in research, he never underestimated its importance in advertising. In fact, in 1952, when he opened his own agency, he billed himself as research director.

Actual results for clients: “In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker unless you can also sell what you create.”

Professional discipline: “I prefer the discipline of knowledge to the anarchy of ignorance.” He codified knowledge into slide and film presentations he called Magic Lanterns. He also instituted several training programs for young advertising professionals.

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